8/17: Risograph Print Workshop with Stephanie Lane Gage

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8/17: Risograph Print Workshop with Stephanie Lane Gage

45.00

Come learn the ways of the Risograph with Martian Press founder and Risograph artist Stephanie Lane Gage.

Attendees will gather from 6 to 8:30 on Thursday, August 17th; the evening will begin with demo and informative talk on the medium of Risography. Attendees are then invited to create a 2-color Risograph print of their own, in an edition of 20, which they are welcome to take home.

Workshoppers have the option to come prepared with their original color layers—meaning two grayscale 'originals' in hard copy form, sized 8.5x11 (for more information on preparing artwork for Riso printing, visit www.martian.press/print). Otherwise attendees are welcome to create their prints during the workshop through collage or drawing.

Colors available at the workshop will be Black, Bright Red, Medium Blue, Green, Yellow, Orange, and Fluorescent Pink. For color swatches, visit www.martian.press/print.

 

So, what is Risography?

The Risograph is a digital duplicator produced by the RISO Company out of Japan. Debuting in 1986, the Risograph reached its peak as cost-effective color-printing office equipment in the late 90's and early aughts before it became somewhat obsolete with the rise of color laser printing. Since then, artists and designers have re-discovered the medium and allowed its second rise in popularity. 

Risograph printing is comparable to screenprinting in that its vibrant ink colors and textures are printed in layers, but the process is less labor-intensive, and a more detailed image can be achieved. The underlying technology is similar to screenprinting as well. First, a grayscale original is scanned on the glass top of the machine, after which that information is burned as a half-toned stencil onto thermal paper, creating a “master.” The thermal-paper master is then wrapped around the cylindrical ink drum, and as paper passes through the machine, the ink drum rolls and pushes ink through the stencil (the master) leaving an impression on the paper.

Sign me up!